e-book The Boer War - A Military History - The Illustrated Edition (Military History from Primary Sources)

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Why the British Army was so effective in 1914 - Learning lessons from Boer War

Both cartoons clearly illustrate the manner in which the artists' 'message' reached the public - through humour and, more specifically, irony. Both are also highly symbolical, portraying Ladysmith as a goodlooking woman with the name 'Ladysmith' written on her skirt or beneath her feet and an archtypal Boer soldier.

Yet, the postcards depict the fall of Ladysmith in different ways, thereby producing different reactions. Es ist erreicht! Lady-Smith ist gefallen' 'Special Edition!

It is achieved! Lady-Smith has fallen'. The irony of the cartoon is that it is a Lady who has fallen, not a town. The strength of the Boer who is able to vanquish the trophy, whom he is bringing back to his President, is emphasised. Male physical power is seen in contrast to the frailty of the Lady, who appears powerless when confronted by the strong man. It is, of course, meant to imply that the Boer Republics are more powerful than the British troops entrenched in Ladysmith. E Keppler's version of the 'Fall of Ladysmith' Author's collection.

The personification of Ladysmith was not, however, unique to the European cartoonists.

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The Boer War - A Military History - The Illustrated Edition

Even British soldiers, despite the hardships of waging war on the South African veld, occasionally saw the lighter side of the conflict and mentioned it in their diaries or correspondence. For example, we can quote part of a letter written by Pte Henry Rooke of the 1st Bn, Kings Liverpool Regiment, to his parents on 25 August 1 'I see that you had no horse flesh. I did not care much for it when I was in the siege of Ladysmith as you know that Mr Kruger fell out with Miss Lady-Smith, he was four months after her but he failed to take her from Sir George White.

So you see, with all the gloom, there is still a little light spiritedness left. The Boer War was called 'the Last of the Gentleman's Wars' as values, which are probably considered old-fashioned today, were vividly present in the people's minds. For example, Lord Methuen, when made a prisoner, was sent back to his own side by General de la Rey, because the Boer could not take care of him.

On Christmas Day, cannon balls filled with pudding rather than powder were sent to the besieged Ladysmith. Today, it is very unlikely that Serbian troops would one day send food to the besieged people in Sarajevo. During the Boer War, the public enjoyed sensational 'scoops' from the front, but often only witnessed the progression of British troops on South African ground.

Today, atrocities committed in Bosnia are often reported in the press. This is not to say, however, that things were better nearly years ago, as the suffering of the besieged people in Ladysmith and Sarajevo must have been similar. The difference lies in the way in which people refer to and talk about the sieges. In , people in Europe did not even know, or care to know, where Ladysmith was; it was so far away and remote that it was difficult to clearly understand the situation especially as the newspapers did not always tell the truth. The besieged population was seen as 'impersonal', faceless, fiction characters in a newspaper.

Furthermore, as the news from Ladysmith was very limited, the European press seldom mentioned the hardships the population had to endure and preferred to speculate on when the town would be relieved or would fall and what would happen thereafter. Thus it was not shocking and disrespectful for the cartoonists in Europe to pun people who were suffering.

Today, the mass medias are different. Television is available to provide vivid accounts of what is happening in ex-Yugoslavia and it is difficult to avoid witnessing the suffering of the population there. In such a context, a pun would be inappropriate. At the turn of the century, there also appears to have been a discrepancy between that which the British soldier actually experienced in the field and what people in Britain thought was happening.

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Soldiers' accounts of the war often implied some bitterness towards the understanding the civilians 'back home' had of the conflict. More filters.

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Sort order. Aug 09, Nerine Dorman rated it really liked it. Granted, I started reading this book because I wanted a better idea of the Anglo Boer War for my Afrikaans module during my first level at Unisa for my BA, so this was pretty much supplementary reading — which means I was more consistent about finishing what I started. Informative, yes, but I had to do my reading in bursts.

The Century and Life of Pieter Arnoldus Krueler

That Paken Granted, I started reading this book because I wanted a better idea of the Anglo Boer War for my Afrikaans module during my first level at Unisa for my BA, so this was pretty much supplementary reading — which means I was more consistent about finishing what I started. Both the British and the Boers are revealed as perpetrators and most certainly not very nice people , and both sides have their heroes and villains, depending the perspective of the viewer. If one has to look from where the roots of the later oppressive apartheid system grew, they clearly lay deeply entrenched in this time, especially in the attitudes shared by colonial powers in Africa.

Thank you, Rhodes, Kruger.

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View 2 comments. Jan 13, Aaron rated it liked it Shelves: military-history.

Equal parts enlightening and frustrating. I read this book because I didn't really know anything significant about the Boer War, and wanted to learn about it. While this book does a solid job of touching on the political aspects of why the war was fought including political developments in Africa and in England , the coverage of the war itself is spotty. Thus the d Equal parts enlightening and frustrating.

Thus the discussions of the sieges and battles jumps around a lot, and it is hard to understand the order of the jumps and confusion as to what is going on is the inevitable result.

Military History – McFarland

If the intent was to give the reader the feeling of the British officers, who seemed to generally not know what they doing or why they were doing it, then props to the author for achieving his aim. If the intent is to inform the reader of the course of the military activities during the war, then the author has failed as badly in his aim as Milner did in his. Still, I at least met my initial aim of learning something about the war. I must seek out other sources for a full discussion of the military activities, though.

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